Medical One and Zedmed upload first document to PCEHR

A doctor at Victorian-based medical centre group Medical One has uploaded the first clinical document directly from a practice management system to an individual's PCEHR.

Medical One, which has nine centres in Victoria and one in South Australia, uses Zedmed's clinical and practice management system throughout its operations. Its founders and owners, Peter Stratmann and Andrew Pascoe, sit on Zedmed's board and the company is also affiliated with the Pathology One diagnostic service.

Its Geelong centre at Waurn Ponds has been working with the software vendor as it tests its interface to the PCEHR, Medical One's general manager, Karen Perham, said.

“That has been a beta site for the work Zedmed is doing and we are now fully compliant throughout Medical One,” Ms Perham said.

She said one of the Geelong centre's GPs, Bernard Shiu, had uploaded a shared health summary to a staff member's PCEHR on October 17 and the group is now able to offer the service to patients.

“A couple of patients have asked about the PCEHR but really not many people know enough about it,” she said. “There is a still a lot of training to do and we are currently writing our policies and procedures on how to use the system.”

Clinical documents have been uploaded to the eHealth record system in recent weeks through two plug-in applications – HIE's Companion Gateway and Pen Computer System's Sidebar tool – but it is believed the Medical One experience is the first case in the country of a document being uploaded natively from a clinical system. Zedmed was the first software product listed as being PCEHR-compliant on NEHTA's new ePIP register.

Zedmed's general manager, Grant Williamson, said the company was "excited by Medical One’s upload and are proud to be a part of such a significant step towards Australia’s eHealth system".

Medical One is an interesting case study in how large medical groups will interact with the eHealth records system, if they so choose. Healthcare organisations must apply for a Seed Healthcare Provider Identifier-Organisation (HPI-O) classification through the Healthcare Identifiers (HI) Service, but multi-site medical centre operators like Medical One must also apply for Network HPI-Os for each practice.

Ms Perham herself is both the responsible officer (RO) authorised to accept responsibility for the participation of the organisation in the HI Service, and an organisation maintenance officer (OMO) responsible for maintaining the accuracy of the HPI-O. She said it was likely that as the new system takes shape, she will allocate the OMO role to one person at each centre.

Medical One has gone through the process of obtaining PKIs for all of its centres through Medicare's Health Professional Online Services (HPOS), including tokens for both clinicians and practice staff.

Medical One is not part of the Melbourne-based Wave site that has been testing different aspects of the whole eHealth system for the last two years, she said.

“We just went and did it on our own. Zedmed have given us so much help and we have been working very collaboratively.”

The next steps are to provide training to all practice staff, she said.

Posted in Australian eHealth

Comments   

# Healthcare Information System 2012-10-26 14:26
I agree, two plug-ins are required to upload the clinical data in the e-Healthcare record. The technology in Healthcare system has been increased day by day. Once the technology is updated, the training session is carried out to make the user understand.
# Pappsy 2013-04-20 08:18
This will never work.
Healthcare organisations must apply for a Seed Healthcare Provider Identifier-Orga nisation (HPI-O) classification through the Healthcare Identifiers (HI) Service, but multi-site medical centre operators like Medical One must also apply for Network HPI-Os for each practice
Try to clarify this nonsence for a start

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