eHealth workshops at rural medicine conference

A preliminary program for Rural Medicine Australia 2014 has been released, featuring workshops on the use of digital technology for patient self-management and how to use technology to optimise access to health services in rural and remote communities.

Rural Medicine Australia, the annual conference and scientific forum of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), is being held in Sydney on October 30 and November 1.

The first workshop is being hosted by Melbourne-based health information provider Sonoa Health and will provide an interactive forum for discussing emerging eHealth tools.

According to the organisers, it will be structured in blocks presenting recent advances in eHealth technology, research from studies into the benefits and drawbacks of using health applications and patient perspectives. Participants will also get hands-on experience to compare and contrast existing health applications.

The workshop will finish with a group discussion on how existing eHealth tools could be improved to better target patients in remote communities.

The second workshop will focus on using technology and workforce innovation to optimise access to health services in rural and remote communities.

While the presenters are yet to be announced, it aims to explore models of care, opportunities for inter-professional collaboration and health service optimisation, and provide a forum for input to policy development at both state and federal levels.

The conference will also feature both ACRRM and RDAA's annual general meetings.

Early-bird registration is open now.

Posted in Australian eHealth

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