AHHA to revamp palliative care portal and training resources

The Palliative Care Online training website is set to be revamped to include new and specifically targeted resources, including two modules on pain management and recognising deteriorating clients.

Developed by the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) in association with Silver Chain and funded by the Department of Health, the portal and new training resources are set to go live on July 1.

AHHA CEO Alison Verhoeven said the focus of the portal will be skills development for improved quality of care and would be a source of genuine value to the palliative care workforce across the country.

The original training modules are based on the COMPAC guidelines for community-based palliative aged care, which have been used by over 20,000 people across Australia and internationally.

The two new units on pain management and recognising deteriorating clients have been developed in partnership with Silver Chain Training and will be available when the portal launches.

“The existing courses have been highly popular,” Ms Verhoeven said. “The new modules, similarly, will meet the needs of a diverse audience. The training is highly interactive with a broad range of learning activities based on case studies which follow the progression of a client’s illness.

“AHHA hopes that the launch of this portal and the free training it provides will assist anyone involved in working in this sensitive area to increase their skills and knowledge and enable them to drive conversations on dying.”

The current four online palliative care modules are available at www.palliativecareonline.com.au, and the portal and new modules will be available at the same site from July 1.

Meanwhile, Assistant Minister for Health Fiona Nash has announced the distribution of $52 million in funds for national palliative care projects, along with a new guide to how to manage social media accounts in the event of a family member's death.

“The guide also encourages people to consider how you wish your social media accounts to be managed after death and whom you would like entrusted with instructions to do this,” Senator Nash said.

Funded palliative care projects include:

  • Queensland University of Technology to continue educating and training the health workforce to provide quality palliative care
  • the University of Wollongong to continue the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration, identifying and measuring the impact of palliative care on people with a life-limiting illness, their families and carers
  • Palliative Care Australia to continue as the peak body for palliative care in Australia, promoting quality end of life care for all
  • Austin Health to continue Respecting Patient Choices, a national program to assist individuals to choose their end of life care and to inform their families, carers and health professionals
  • Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service for a national project to improve paediatric palliative care
  • Integrated living Australia and Charles Sturt University to deliver projects focussed on person-centred palliative care, and bench-marking of skills
  • Carers Australia Incorporated to deliver training to support carers of palliative care patients
  • Cabrini Health to develop an advance care planning online resource, taking account of various religious and cultural considerations
  • the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare to continue palliative care data analysis and reporting; and
  • Flinders University of South Australia for CareSearch, an online palliative care resource; the Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative; and development of education modules on end of life care in acute hospital settings.

Posted in Australian eHealth

You need to log in to post comments. If you don't have a Pulse+IT website account, click here to subscribe.

Sign up for Pulse+IT eNewsletters

Sign up for Pulse+IT website access

For more information, click here.

Copyright © 2017 Pulse+IT Magazine
No content published on this website can be reproduced by any person for any reason without the prior written permission of the publisher.