DoHA rejects concerns about NEHTA’s future role

The Department of Health and Ageing has rejected as “laughable” opposition questions about whether there were plans for the National E-Health Transition Authority (NEHTA) to ever function as a commercial entity in the e-health marketplace.

During a Senate Estimates Committee hearing held in mid February, Liberal Senator Sue Boyce queried the future status of the authority in a prolonged period questioning Department of Health and Ageing officials about the Health Identifier legislation that was recently introduced into parliament.

“This concern has been put to me by people from private companies or who are stakeholders who are concerned that they are being asked to share secret commercial information with an organisation that they are not entirely confident may not at some stage be in competition with them,” said Boyce, after asking whether there was any intention that NEHTA would function as a commercial entity — “when we drop the ‘T’ [Transition] out, presumably”.

The line of questioning is believed to have been prompted by industry concerns about NEHTA’s role in the Northern Territory Government’s development of a secure messaging solution, which has led to the decommissioning of software developed by ArgusConnect in some NT clinics.

Department of Health and Ageing secretary Jane Halton said the Commonwealth, state and territorial governments had not had a discussion about NEHTA’s future governance arrangements.

“I have to say, my personal opinion is it is unlikely it would function in a commercial way,” she said. ” I cannot say one way or the other, but certainly given its function is quite specified and its owners are Commonwealth and state ministers, I cannot see why that would be the case.”

Halton further added that the notion that governments could supplant commercial organisations or play in the commercial e-health sector was “frankly ... laughable”.

“If I, in my case as a director, with my state and territory colleagues were interested in building some vast monolith, we would have indicated that. That is not what we are interested in,” she said. ” It is not our business, core or otherwise, to be competing with the commercial sector.”

Posted in Australian eHealth

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